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According to the Montreal Gazette, Montreal police have issued an arrest warrant for Sheikh Muhammad ibn Musa al Nasr, a Palestinian-Jordanian imam who, in a sermon in the Dar Al-Arqam Mosque in Montreal in late 2016, allegedly referred to Jews as “the worst among mankind” and “human demons” and said that he looked forward to the end of days when they would be destroyed. The imam also quoted a well-known hadith, the hadith of the Gharqad Tree, in which stones and trees encourage Muslims to come and kill Jews who are hiding behind them. That hadith is quoted in full in the Hamas Charter.

The B’nai Brith of Canada lodged the criminal complaint against al Nasr and were satisfied with the police response. In March last year, after al Nasr’s sermon, the Muslim Council of Montreal called on the mosque to apologise for having invited him. It is not known whether the mosque did so. The Dar al Arqam Mosque is one of the few mosques in Montreal not under the umbrella of the Muslim Council of Montreal, but it seems that the imam’s behaviour constitutes a pattern in Montreal:

In June 2017 a Youtube video was released of Sheikh Wael Al-Ghitawi whose sermon, in November 2014 at the Al Andalous Islamic Centre in Montreal, was against “the people who slayed the prophets, shed their blood, and cursed the Lord …” Also in early June, a video from August 2014 and released on YouTube showed a different imam at the same mosque allegedly calling for the destruction of “the accursed Jews” and that they be killed “one by one.”

In relation this latest incident, the CBC reported the Muslim Montreal Council’s statement which included the following: that “to use the themes of the Prophet to spread hatred is actually something that is disrespectful towards the Prophet himself.”

That may or may not be true, but the statement is is notable more for what it does not say than for what it does: One can speculate about what might be meant by “using the themes of the Prophet to spread hatred” but highly significant is the statement’s emphasis on al Nasr’s sermon showing disrespect towards the Muslim prophet, whilst at the same time it ignores the immense disrespect and hatred that the sermon showed towards Jews or the sense of threat it might have engendered. There is also the matter of the apology required from the mosque for having hosted al Nasr, but notably no such apology was given.


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