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Four employees of Delta Airlines, all flight attendants with experience ranging from 10 to 40 years, are suing the airline for alleged antisemitic discrimination.

The four claim to have experienced “a pattern of intentionally discriminating and retaliating against ethnically Jewish, Hebrew and/or Israeli employees and passengers”.

One alleges that she was dismissed in March 2017, with Delta claiming the dismissal was the result of a missed flight. She alleges that she was granted leave for a medical emergency and that the dismissal was motivated by the fact that she was Jewish.

Another claims she was fired after lending her staff pass to a Jewish friend of 40 years, with Delta claiming that she did not know the man, putting her in breach of policy.

Other claims involve being passed up for deserved promotions, as well as the creation of a hostile working environment for Jewish staff, apparently centred around flights to Israel in particular.

Whilst the extent to which we can comment on ongoing court proceedings is very limited, the nature of the allegations is extremely serious. Whilst antisemitism has evolved to be subtle, hard to detect and in some ways more insidious than the overt workplace discrimination that previous generations of Jews experienced routinely, these allegations, if true, will represent a huge step in the wrong direction at the heart of a major employer.


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SOURCETMZ
Daniel Leons-Marder is the editor of Everyday Antisemitism. He first became involved with Campaign Against Antisemitism when he became aware of Holocaust denial books being sold by Amazon. He graduated in Summer 2016 with First Class Honours and as Dux Litterarum in Comparative Literature and Philosophy from Royal Holloway. He is currently at law school. He was previously a recording and touring musician.