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Conspiracy Theory Education Europe Everyday Antisemitism Location Medium South West of England United Kingdom

University of Bristol lecturer pens article accusing “government elites” of “manipulating” the Holocaust

An anonymous letter from a University of Bristol student has been published on Epigram, addressed to one of the student’s lecturers, which criticises an antisemitic article penned by the academic.

The student says that the academic’s article was published in a magazine which “regularly (and proudly) publishes pieces by Holocaust deniers, ‘Jewish lobby’ conspiracy theorists, and 9/11 truthers”.

The article accused “government elites” of “manipulating” the Holocaust, and claiming that we are discouraged from “critical […] thinking” about the Holocaust.

This is umabiguously the language of Holocaust denial. Searching for these words together on Google will yield a plethora of Holocaust denial sites claiming that either Israel or the Western Powers fabricated or exaggerated the Holocaust, or that the Holocaust is “manipulated” to generate sympathy of Jews or for Israel. Both of these positions are antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, and it is very hard to see anything else to which such comments could refer.

Given that he apparently begins the article by writing about how, in the student’s words, “criticism of Israel is unfairly stifled by charges of antisemitism”, it seems clear that he means to associate these “government elites” with the state of Israel.

He also claimed that we should stop “privileging” the Holocaust.

The anonymous student laments the fact that her lecturer cannot understand that “‘privilege’ and ‘Holocaust’ don’t belong in the same sentence”.

The lecturer is likely referring to the perception that the Holocaust is commemorated more than other genocides. This is a belief espoused by Labour antisemite Jacqui Walker, who said during Labour Party Conference: “wouldn’t it be wonderful if Holocaust day was open to all peoples who’ve experienced Holocaust“. However, as was pointed out then, and must be pointed out now, charities such as the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust do indeed educate about all genocides. Sadly, such comments are rarely bona fide attempts to further understanding of other genocides, and are often used to devalue and belittle the Jewish experience of the Holocaust. Additionally, the comments must be read alongside his other statements which hint at Holocaust denial, and in light of this can only be seen as antisemitic.

He also allegedly compares Israel to Nazi Germany, a comparison which is antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In the University’s response to the letter, they concede that Epigram verified all quotes from the anonymous piece

The University writes that it “believes that freedom of expression and academic freedom are at the heart of its mission. Our approach is to enable and promote free speech and encourage debate of all kinds. This means that there must be an atmosphere of free and open discussion. It also means that occasionally academics will put forward a view that is contrary to the views of others.”

“However, where there are serious concerns about public disorder or the direct incitement of violence or hatred, or where a student feels that they are subject to unacceptable behaviour they should raise this with their personal tutor, warden or Just Ask”

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Education Europe Everyday Antisemitism Location Medium South West of England United Kingdom Ξ Channels Ξ E-mail Ξ Social Media

UK: antisemitic, white supremacist slogans at Exeter University party

972 has reported that antisemitic and white supremacist slogans were visible on students’ t-shirts at an off-campus event in Exeter, attended by University of Exeter students. The University of Exeter is one of the UK’s top institutions.

A social event of the Snow Sports society at the Timepiece nightclub on Tuesday night saw various students with white t-shirts, which they and other students wrote on.

One slogan written on a t-shirt read “The Holocaust was a good time”. Another read “Don’t speak to me if you’re not white”.

There were also two students with Swastikas on their t-shirts.

Lauren Fry, head of the Snow Sports Society commented:

“Comments like these are not tolerated within our club,” she said. “Unfortunately, as only eight committee members, we can not be responsible for everything written by other students, especially when there is over 1,000 people. Timepiece were asking people to leave or change if they were seen in the venue with any abusive slogans on their t- shirts. As far as I’m aware no complaints were made. We apologise if we offended any one and we feel appropriate action was taken on the night to deal with these type of slogans if they were seen on anyone at our social. Snowsports has a zero tolerance policy for these actions and we will be contacting our members in due course to express this”

And a University of Exeter spokesman added:

“The university does not tolerate racist or bigoted behaviour in any form. This is the first we knew of this and shall be launching a full investigation”.

The prolific Jewish issues blogger “Elder of Ziyon” criticised 972’s coverage of this story, which lamented not simply the fact that a clear-cut antisemitic incident had occurred, but instead felt the need to emphasise that they “directly affect national conversation on racism, anti-Semitism and Israel-Palestine”. Antisemitic incidents are not bad because they make pro-Palestinian discourse look bad, or because they may make people more receptive to the concerns of Zionists. They are bad in their own right and need no further qualification of this fact.

Elder of Ziyon writes:

“But Reimer apparently is upset about antisemites who also hate Israel, because they make all Israel-haters look like antisemites.

As a result, a story about antisemitism must be contextualized to say ‘hey, we Israel bashers are against antisemitism too! Not only because it is deplorable, but also because it makes us look bad!'”

This news comes amidst concerns of rising antisemitism on University campuses, particularly following the election of Malia Bouattia as head of the National Union of Students (NUS) and the subsequent decision to strip Jewish students of the right to elect their own representatives. There have been several high profile cases of antisemitism and intimidation of Jewish students on UK campuses, including the resignation of the head of Oxford University Labour Club amidst concerns of a culture of antisemitism both there and on other campuses and the disruption of a pro-Israel event, involving the assault of a Jewish student at King’s College London. Recently, a Jewish student was awarded over a thousand pounds in compensation after being subjected to two years of antisemitic abuse at the University of York. A report by Lesley Klaff at Sheffield Hallam University states that Jewish students “frequently complain of anti-Semitic harassment”, which is subsequently only handled by the Student Unions, with University officials often unwilling to take solid action.

Last year it was reported that Jewish students were selecting their University choices not based upon where they felt they would have the best education, or find the courses that interested them the most, but instead were making these important choices on the grounds of where they are least likely to encounter antisemitism. In light of this, and in light of the myriad of other worrying events that have affected Jewish students in the UK, incidents such as this only cement the fact that antisemitism is becoming increasingly normalised and Jewish students are becoming increasingly marginalised on University campuses.

 

 

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Europe Everyday Antisemitism Hate Mail Location Medium South West of England United Kingdom Verbal Abuse Ξ Channels Ξ E-mail Ξ Social Media

Jewish businessman called “Jew boy” by neighbour, told to leave the country

A retired 71-year-old woman has pleaded guilty to religiously or racially aggravated harassment after subjecting her Jewish neighbour to a campaign of abuse.

Susan Dean subjected her neighbour Allan Rich to antisemitic abuse which stemmed from a dispute over their adjoining beach huts. The huts come with the seafront properties, but Mrs Dean was initially upset as she felt that Mr Rich and his friends “encroached” and prevented her from enjoying her hut.

Mr Rich is the chairman of the management committee for the block of luxury flats, and was the CEO of a successful company.

Mrs Dean left Mr Rich an anonymous note in which she called him “Jew boy”, a common term of antisemitic abuse.

Three days later, she told Mr Rich in another note that he should leave the country.

She also said that she could not attend a communal barbecue as she “was not Jewish”, which appears to be her suggesting that Jews make non-Jews feel unwelcome and are only concerned with other Jews, a common antisemitic canard.

Mr Rich and his wife were apparently so upset by the antisemitic abuse that they were reduced to tears and were fearful of using their own balcony as Mrs Dean may have been using hers.

The prosecutor said “These aren’t off the cuff handwritten notes, they are typed up notes that were then placed in strategic places and they clearly caused the aggrieved a lot of distress”.

In his appeal to a magistrate asking for a restraining order, Mr Rich stated:

“[Susan Dean’s] religious hate is causing me and my family great sadness.”

“I have never had to deal with such a horrible situation in my whole life. I can no longer go out on my balcony because she will shout abuse and we can no longer walk around the side of our flat because if she is there she will shout at us, so we have to walk our dog on a different route.”

“When we received the first note my wife and I could not sleep that night. We were both led to tears.

I’m not sure why anyone would want to do it or how they could be so vile. I’m not even sure how she knew my religion.

I do not want to be abused at my own home, my wife doesn’t feel safe coming down with other family members and I do not feel safe for my wife to be their alone.

This caused us to cut our stay in Sandbanks short, but she has also been sending abusive letters to our other address.

I’m worried she may react one day and do something out of the ordinary, that she could be stood at my door with a knife, because I do not know how much she hates me and my religion or how far she may go to satisfy her hate”.

Mrs Dean was fined and was given a restraining order, prohibiting her from having any contact with Mr Dean or his family.

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Everyday Antisemitism Politics South West of England Twitter Ξ E-mail

Former British Labour MP links antisemitism to “brutal” Israelis

Former Labour MP for Derby North, Chris Williamson, has reacted to the exposure of rampant antisemitism at the Oxford University Labour Club by tweeting, “I hope they won’t find any such evidence. Did you see this [Channel 4] News item; brutal”. Williamson appears to both suggest that antisemitism had not been taking place at Oxford University Labour Club, despite numerous reports, not least from the Co-Chair who resigned in disgust at it, and that it is somehow linked to perceived “brutal” actions by Israel.

The most widely-accepted definition of antisemitism states that “holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel” is antisemitic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has asked the Labour Party to investigate Chris Williamson over his tweet.

Labour Students and the University of Oxford are now understood to be investigating the Oxford University Labour Club.

Source: Sussex Friends of Israel

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Everyday Antisemitism South West of England Verbal Abuse Ξ E-mail

UK journalist forces antisemite to disembark from train for claiming “ISIS was created by the Jews”

British journalist James Bloodworth has posted on Facebook that he forced a man to disembark from a train after he made antisemitic comments. Bloodworth said that he had an altercation with the man after he refused to remove his bags from Bloodworth’s seat at the start of the journey. After he had eventually agreed to remove the bags, Bloodworth took his seat and settled down to read is book, ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror. His fellow passenger asked what Bloodworth was reading, to which he replied that it is a book about ISIS. The man replied: “You mean the Israeli intelligence services.” Bloodworth said he ignored the comment until the man pressed: “You do know that ISIS was created by the Jews? Who is the book by?” When Bloodworth told him that the book was by Michael Weiss and Hassan Hassan, the man allegedly responded “Weiss is a Jewish name.” Bloodworth says he then asked the man to stop talking to him, but the man insisted, claiming that “No Jews died in the Holocaust. It’s a hoax. The gas chambers and all that. You’re just uninformed.” Bloodworth said he kept repeating the point and when he used the word “Sheeple,” Bloodworth lost his temper, telling the man that he would forcibly eject him at the next stop. According to Bloodworth’s account, he allowed the man to gather his belongings before marching him to the door, saying: “You’re getting off this f***ing train” to a small round of applause from fellow passengers.

Bloodworth ended his Facebook post saying: “I’m a nice guy who’s kind to animals, children and my grandmother. But don’t slander the Jews in the quiet coach.”

Source: Harry’s Place

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Everyday Antisemitism South West of England Vandalism Ξ E-mail

Nappy changing room in remote Devonshire village defaced with antisemitic graffiti again

A room for changing babies’ nappies in a remote village on the outskirts of Lynton, Devonshire has reportedly been “covered” with antisemitic graffiti for the third time in two years. The graffiti included swastikas and slogans such as “No Jews on the moor”. Local police have appealed for witnesses.

Photo: North Devon Journal